Latin Policies and FAQ

Registration, Tuition and Payments

How old must a student be to register?
When can I register?
How do I register?
What are the hybrid and audit sections?
Please explain the waitlist process!
What registration forms are due from new students, and when?
What registration forms are due from returning students, and when?
When is tuition due, and how can I pay?
Does Lone Pine give tuition refunds under any circumstances?
Do you accept payment from charter schools?

Technical Questions

What are the technical requirements?
When will you post the class recording?
What are all these websites and logins for?
Please explain Quia quizzes and logging in to Quia
How do I get technical support from eLecta?

Lone Pine Policies

How does the free one-on-one tutoring work?
What are the tutoring policies?
Who should sign up for tutoring?

Curriculum, Materials and Extracurriculars

What materials are needed?
What is the discussion board?
What are the Alces, 10th Legion, Novi Homines, and Teucri?
What AP scores have students received so far?

Frequently Asked Questions

How do these classes work?
A note about attendance
How much time does the class take? (READ THIS ONE!)
What is the parents' role?
Is Lone Pine accredited?
What are the teacher's qualifications?
What about religion?


Registration, Tuition and Payments:

How old must a student be to register?

Students need to be 12 years old or have parents email us for instructor approval.  Students should be working at a ninth grade level (taking at least algebra I, reading 9th grade level books such as Great Expectations, Journey to the Center of the Earth, Silas Marner, Tess of the D'Urbervilles, The War of the Worlds, Uncle Tom's Cabin [found based on an AR Bookfind reading level 9 search]). We have had very successful eleven-year-old students, but keep in mind that this most students in our program are classified as gifted (EG/PG is most common), so your student will be in class with profoundly gifted 13-15 year olds; it is not an appropriate course choice for PG 9 year olds.  Most Latin 100 students are ~13 years old, though the range is often 11 to 16 years old.

One thing to keep in mind:  Students must be 12 years old by April to attend the COJCL State Convention.  I am holding back my own sons so that they begin Latin 100 no earlier than age 12, so they can attend Convention every year eligible.

When can I register?

We take names throughout the year for the following year's interest list. Please feel free to register at any point for next year's classes. The first 24 on the interest list are guaranteed a spot in the live section. A waitlist is maintained, and the seats for which parents do not turn in registration paperwork and fees (due August 1) are opened to waitlisted students in the order in which they registered. (Many parents on the fence about homeschooling will register to save a seat just in case they need it, and then decide to send their child to school and drop before August 1. We will know on August 1 how many are dropping from the interest list, and how many are officially registered.) Students still on the waitlist when classes begin can participate via the hybrid plan until a live seat opens for them.

How do I register?

Please fill out a Registration Form as soon as you think you may be interested in a course. It is a no-obligation, no-cost way to reserve a seat for your student while you plan your school year. This puts you on the interest list for your desired course, and you cannot lose your seat as long as you return the registration materials by August 1. After August 1, seats of students who have not turned in their Registration form, Summer Survey, and $40 registration fee are opened to waitlisted students.

What are the hybrid and audit sections?

Hybrid section:  This is an overflow section for Latin 100.  The live section must be full for the hybrid section to be created.  Students in this section watch recorded classes (since the live section is full), but participate fully in all other ways -- turn in homework/tests for a grade, can sign up for one-on-one tutoring, use the discussion board and all other student features.  As soon as a live seat opens, a hybrid student can move into it.  The hybrid section only exists when the live section is full.  Hybrid students have a tuition discount (see Tuition and Paypal Link page).

Audit section:  Students have access to the dropbox of course materials and recorded classes, but do not receive any individual help, cannot attend live sessions, and do not receive a grade.  Students are invisible observers, not participants; students are not able to contact the instructor with questions or use the discussion board.  Tuition is only $100/semester.

Please explain the waitlist process!

Do not despair! The waitlist moves very quickly in early August, as we follow up with families who did not submit the registration materials by August 1. Most of those families had reserved a seat while making plans for the school year, and have decided to send their children to a full-time school for the upcoming year. If you are still waitlisted in late August, it is not the end of the world! While your student is waitlisted, he/she can still participate in class via the hybrid plan (watch recorded classes, but be a full student in all other ways -- have access to the discussion board, all materials, private tutoring, and the help sessions). Your student will be able to keep up with the class while waiting for a seat in the live section. Some of our most enthusiastic students have spent time in the hybrid section while waiting for a seat to open. They found that they were able to participate thoroughly enough on the discussion board and in tutoring sessions that when they joined as a live student, the transition was seamless. Ms. Karppinen should be able to give you an idea of where you stand on the waitlist, and a rough guess as to how long the wait may be. Students tend to drop in early August, since the registration paperwork is due August 1, after the second week of classes when the free trial period ends, and at the end of fall semester (late January).

What registration forms are due from new students, and when?

For NEW Lone Pine families, a $40 one-time FAMILY registration fee (applies to all students from that family with no expiration date), the Registration form, and the Summer Survey are all due on August 1.  The registration fee applies to any Lone Pine courses -- e.g. the fee does NOT need to be paid again when switching from Latin to Greek.

What registration forms are due from returning students, and when?

Students are automatically enrolled in the next course, unless they tell me that they are leaving. Once you have a seat, you cannot lose it!

For ALL Lone Pine students (new and returning, and new students from returning families), the Summer Survey is due on August 1.

When is tuition due, and how can I pay?

At the end of the second week of class (after the student has attended 4 classes and has decided to commit to the course), the semester's tuition balance is due. Student accounts on eLecta expire one week after the due date.  If a student chooses to withdraw after sending a tuition payment, REFUNDS ARE NOT AVAILABLE. (Refund policy – see below). For payment, you may either mail a check or use our Paypal Payments Link. If using Paypal, please add 4% to cover Paypal fees.

Does Lone Pine give tuition refunds under any circumstances?

No, Lone Pine does NOT issue tuition refunds under any circumstances. Since we offer a two-week trial (students can try the full-featured class for two weeks for just the registration fee), ALL TUITION PAYMENTS are NON-REFUNDABLE. Refunds are not available under any circumstances. Please only send payment once you are certain you wish to remain in the course for the duration of the semester. It is our understanding that most online providers insist on payment for a full year-long course before the course even begins; we are trying to be as flexible as possible without creating bookkeeping disasters.

Do you accept payment from charter schools?

Yes, but only from those who can pay tuition by the due dates posted, and for which Lone Pine does not need to do any paperwork (those for which parents can submit the paperwork for the course on their own, or submit paperwork to Ms. K which only needs a signature).


Technical Questions

What are the technical requirements?

For the online classroom (eLecta), ALL students MUST have a working microphone (headsets work very well), WEBCAM, and have a high-speed internet connection. Electa does work with all operating systems (even Linux) and with many devices (even ipads), though laptop/desktop computers are recommended.

When will you post the class recording?

I usually post the class recordings at night. Please email me if the following day arrives (7 a.m. Mountain Time) and the recording is not posted.

What are all these websites and logins for?

Main site - www.lonepineclassical.com - this is our "Moodle" site, which you navigate to get course materials and information and to get to all the other sites. Your gradebook and our calendar is here.

Quia - Visit it (using the links given on this Moodle site) to take vocabulary quizzes, tests, or play review games. You can enter the Student Zone to see your results on taken quizzes. Be sure to wait for them to be hand-graded! Quia's automatic grade is only on the computer-scored portions, and Quia does not award partial credit. (I do.)

eLecta - Our online classroom. You reach it through this Moodle site. Logins and passwords for each site will be sent to you!

Please explain Quia quizzes and logging in to Quia

You do not need to log in to the Quia site, per se. You can just log in to each quiz as it asks you to. The review games do not make you log in. You can log in to Quia if you want to see things you've done in the past; to do that, go here: http://www.quia.com/web/studentZoneBegin.html

One thing to keep in mind once class starts is that I will hand-grade everything once the due date has passed. Quia will give you an instant score, but that is only for the things that it can score by computer. If, for example, the answer is "Helen of Troy" and you accidentally type "Hellen of Troy," Quia will mark it wrong, but I will change it to right once I go through by hand.

How do I get technical support from eLecta?

You can go to this page to browse their knowledgebase:  http://support.e-lecta.com/, or you can email them here:  Start a support ticket.


Lone Pine Policies:

How does the free one-on-one tutoring work?

Our head Latin tutor offers four 30-minute tutoring slots per week to Latin students of all levels.  Our other tutors offer one to four 30-minute tutoring slots per week.

Tutoring begins the first week of September.  The head tutor maintains the tutoring schedule.  Please email the head tutor (log in to this site to message him/her or request his/her email address from Ms. K) to schedule a tutoring session with ANY tutor (specify the date and time you’re requesting).

You can request a tutoring session one week in advance; i.e., a 9/20 tutoring session becomes available for people to sign up for on 9/13. Tutoring sessions can be reserved up until their start time, if they are not yet claimed; i.e., you can message the head tutor at 9:55 for the 10 a.m. session, but at least 24 hours’ notice is strongly encouraged.

What are the tutoring policies?

Students may sign up for a session beginning one week before it is scheduled to take place (no earlier). You may message the head tutor up until the session actually begins to claim it, if unclaimed. (Check the calendar often to see which sessions are unclaimed; the head tutor fills them in as they are claimed.)  If you have had many tutoring sessions or have an A in the course, the tutor may request that you wait to sign up until other students have had a chance to claim a session.

Students who arrive more than 10 minutes late to their session, miss their session, or give less than 48 hours’ notice for a cancellation will be asked to contribute $10 to the Convention Scholarship fund.

The tutoring schedule can NOT be changed. That is, a student cannot request tutoring but ask a tutor to move it to another day or time to fit his/her schedule. If students are not available during any of the scheduled tutoring times, they will not be able to utilize the tutoring service, and are encouraged to ask questions on the discussion board (or by emailing Ms K).  With eight different time slots being offered, I would hope that every student would be able to find at least one that fits his/her schedule!

Who should sign up for tutoring?

EVERYONE! I very strongly encourage everyone to take full advantage of the free one-on-one tutoring sessions! Even if you do not have any troublesome topics or questions, it is a great way to review with a student who has earned an A or A+ in your current course, meet the upper level students, and work through examples and practice sentences with someone other than Ms. K (with her penchant for violence... too much Caesar! :). For Latin 200s, this is a golden opportunity to have your journal entries proofread before they are scored. Note that tutors cannot give you words/sentences to use in your entries, but they can give you suggestions and highlight things they recommend you revise (and explain the grammar involved, giving you examples, and repeat this process until you have successfully revised your entry). If the tutoring sessions are filling rapidly every week and/or some students who wish to have tutoring sessions are finding them full, I do suggest that students with a grade of 90% or higher take a week off tutoring to allow other students who may need more urgent help to claim more sessions while they raise their grades. If you wish to sign up for tutoring but do not see any empty sessions, please message the head tutor, and he/she will find you a session ASAP!


Curriculum, Materials and Extracurriculars:

What materials are needed?

All students:  A microphone is required; a headset-style microphone is recommended to avoid echo issues.

Latin 100: Students do need to purchase the Orberg textbook - Lingua Latina per se Illustrata, Pars I: Familia Romana - not an expensive book! That is the only item to purchase. Students will receive a wealth of teacher-created materials via a special download link. The materials contain extensive materials -- informational packets for each chapter, video clips, audio recordings of each chapter, English translations of each chapter, answer keys for all homework, and other useful documents. You do NOT need to purchase any ancillaries - e.g. workbook, CD - our versions are included in the materials you will download. Latin 200-400: Details will be provided to students, but the procedure is quite similar to Latin 100.

Latin 200:  We use the same materials as Latin 100.  Nothing to purchase!

Latin 300/400 Prose:  There are no books to purchase for Caesar, Cicero, Pliny, the Vulgate, or our other authors.  We do use Wheelock's Latin as a review text; it is all material that you already know, but it's useful to work through as a review for AP Latin, and a good reference book to have on your shelf.  You _can_ try using the newest edition, http://tinyurl.com/nv4ny39, but I would stick with the linked edition for the present.  If you are transferring in from a Wheelock course, you will need an Orberg book (the Latin 100-200 textbook linked above).  It wouldn’t hurt for everyone to own a Traupman dictionary (don’t pay more than $6), but it’s not absolutely necessary.  http://tinyurl.com/nasqg4j

Latin 300/400 Poetry:   Catullus (http://www.bolchazy.com/A-Catullus-Workbook-P3389.aspx) and Horace (http://www.bolchazy.com/A-Horace-Workbook-P3519.aspx) workbooks, plus the Vergil workbook (listed for AP) if continuing on to AP.

AP Latin:  Please purchase the Vergil workbook, if you do not have it from 300/400 Poetry, and the Caesar workbook from Bolchazy.

What is the discussion board?

The Discussion Board is your go-to place for questions, answers, and discussions of all kinds.

PARENTS, if you wish to use the board, please request your own account and request that I add you to the 'Parents' group -- there is a Parent forum, invisible to students, which you are welcome to join. You can see all of the student fora as well.

STUDENTS, this is the place to ask homework questions and any other questions you have about the course. Please read the titles of each forum, and make sure that your posts are in the proper location, are kind, and are appropriate (would be OK for anyone of any age, from an 8-year old child to your grandmother, to read).  Gratias!

What are the Alces, 10th Legion, Novi Homines, and Teucri?

These are the names for our four legions -- the four groups of students each containing members from every Latin class (e.g. the 20 Alces may be comprised of two AP students, four Latin 300/400 students, six Latin 200 students, and eight Latin 100 students. Yes, it's similar to the Harry Potter houses.  Various class assignments encourage these students to work with each other to review material, since explaining an idea to someone else is a great way to review it oneself. Each group works together in the spirit competition, to build camaraderie. Each group also has its own private forum on the discussion board that only fellow group members can see. Participating in your group's discussions and other activities is a good way to get to know other students, and a good way to get a "big picture" sense of the Latin program; the 300s may explain to a 100 why they need to know their current grammar topic, or give them hints about very important vocabulary words to know.

What AP scores have students received so far?

So far, we have received five 5, eight 4, and one 3 score, so the mean is 4.29.  The 2014 national mean score for AP Latin was 3.05. A 5 on the AP is corresponding to an A in the course and a 4 is corresponding to a B, thus far. More are coming in July!


Frequently Asked Questions:

How do these classes work?

Latin classes meet online (via eLecta) for two formal 75-minute class sessions (90-minute for AP). Each class has a scheduled meeting time, e.g. from 8:15 to 9:30 a.m. on Tuesdays and Thursdays (Mountain Time). If you cannot attend during that time, you may watch a recording of the class at your convenience. Recordings are posted by the following morning.  Students and parents can check grades via the online gradebook, which is updated weekly. Students take tests and do other activities on the class page on this site (called our Moodle page) or on Quia page (for tests and quizzes; links are given on their Moodle class pages).

A note about attendance

Our policy is that if you are present in class, you need to be fully participating due to the nature of the class (and the fact that when people are frozen but can't tell on their end, I can help fix them by booting them out so they can return). If you're sick on a particular day, then get some rest during class and watch the recording when you're feeling better. The few sick days you have won't affect your participation grade that much. We have this policy because it gets confusing and students tell me that it's not fair when people log in to class but say they aren't participating (or don't respond to questions/polls). It also slows us down because I do pay attention to everyone rather than giving a presentation into the void, and we wait for everyone to reply to many polls/questions before moving on. It also detracts from class morale and camaraderie, since everyone makes mistakes when learning new things, but someone just observing won't be taking those risks along with everyone else, so people feel like they're on stage and are less likely to answer questions.

How much time does the class take? (READ THIS ONE!)

or Latin 100 and 200, the homework time LIMIT is 4 hours/week. (This does not count time spent studying for tests.) If the homework takes you longer than that, STOP working and email me to let me know how much you completed, and what your study strategy has been.

What is the parents' role?

Parents are expected to proctor exams (4 per year for Latin 100-200) and administer the National Latin Exam (NLE) in March (registration will be done for you!).

Beyond that, parents may OPT to attend the online classes with their students, help with homework, and participate in any manner they wish. Parents should roughly monitor study time and contact me if Latin is taking their student 4 hours/week or more -- 4 hours is the maximum homework time limit; students taking more than 4 hours generally need study tips to help them work more efficiently.

I recommend that parents check their students' grades at least once per month (more often for young students), and follow up with their student about any missing assignments.

Is Lone Pine accredited?

No, we are not. Accreditation does not necessarily equate to quality courses.  

For Latin, we believe that our students' many achievements and awards are a more accurate gauge of course quality than accreditation.  Students and parents will receive documentation for their records / homeschool transcripts. Students will also receive National Latin Exam scores each year and will each create a portfolio of work (I recommend that you print your graded tests, presentations, assignments, reading lists and Latin 200 journals) to show to any evaluators. Lone Pine students have always placed well when entering K12 schools and colleges, more than once earning "more placement test credit than we have ever seen!" (UGA and an East Coast boarding school). Students who attend Convention always place very well in the pool of Colorado/Wyoming/etc. public and private school Latin students who attend.

For the PG/EG day program, accreditation does not make sense for a micro school (four full-time students maximum). 

What are the teacher's qualifications?

Ms K has been teaching since 1999, with Lone Pine since 2003. She is a Michigan and Colorado-certified teacher (K-6 all subjects, grades 7-12 math and science), working on her MA in Latin. View Ms K's resume.

What about religion?

Lone Pine courses are open to students of any background – everyone is welcome! Ms. K does not discuss her own religious beliefs (but has been known to utter "sancta vacca!" at times). Roman mythology is required for the NLE, but it’s not our focal point. (We finish it quickly – in a “survey” fashion – and don’t explore any myths in great depth until we read the Aeneid in 300/400 Poetry.) We may read selections from the Vulgate Bible in Latin 200 and 300/400 Prose; in addition to any special significance it may have for your family, it has historical value, is genuine Latin, and is actually easy reading (boosts students’ confidence when they see they can understand “real” Latin). The Orberg textbook, in later chapters, explores different belief systems present in the Roman Empire, including early Christianity. If you plan to study church history, this would be a great stepping-off point. All students will probably receive a handout or two with church-related Latin (“Adeste Fideles,” the “Pater Noster,” etc.) – things Latin students should be aware of, since they will likely encounter those Latin references in daily life.

Lone Pine policy is, "We don't discuss religion or politics at Lone Pine events, including Convention."

Last modified: Tuesday, 13 September 2016, 4:41 PM