Latin Course Descriptions

Latin Sequence Overview

Latin 100: Students working at a ninth grade level (at least age 12 or with instructor approval). No Prerequisites: New students with no Latin experience are very welcome!

  • Overview: Thorough first-year high school Latin course emphasizing Latin & English grammar, vocabulary (with English derivatives), Roman history & culture, ancient geography, mythology, and reading proficiency. Build your English vocabulary (great SAT/college prep)!
  • Activities: Participate in the National Latin Exam (NLE) - can win an award! Fun class activities. Great resume-builders: Win a National Latin Exam award, join National and Colorado Junior Classical Leagues (if you wish to travel, you can attend Colorado's state-wide convention in April!), earn a scholarship, become a member of the National Latin Honors Society!
  • Academic Info: 1 high-school credit; documentation provided for your records. Solidify your study skills & gain confidence that you can work at a college-prep pace. Class begins in late August and meets for 1 hour 15 minutes twice/week (for approx. 35 weeks) - Plus an optional online help session once/week!
  • Tuition: Tuition includes two online classes/week (plus optional FREE private tutoring sessions!), Quia website access, access to recorded classes (never miss a class!), additional materials (you'll receive a Dropbox link to download them), NLE/NJCL/COJCL fees + more! Try the course for 2 weeks for just the cost of registration ($40)! Please email Karen Karppinen with questions.

Latin 200: Continuation of Latin 100, with an introduction to writing in Latin. Tuition includes materials/fees + individual help! National Latin Exam – can win an award!  Latin 200 covers Orberg chapters 17-35 (finish Book I). Can participate in Colorado Junior Classical League, National Latin Honors Society; can win scholarships and awards. GREAT for college applications!

Latin 300/400 (Prose): Read Caesar, Cicero, Pliny, Vulgate Bible, other authors. (No books to purchase!) Work on Latin composition. National Latin Exam – can win an award! Can participate in Latin Club, Colorado Junior Classical League, National Latin Honors Society; can win scholarships and awards.  GREAT for college applications!

Latin 300/400 (Poetry): (Some textbooks may need to be purchased.) Read selections from Catullus, Horace, Ovid, Vergil, and Martial. Further work on Latin composition. National Latin Exam – can win an award!  Can participate in Latin Club, Colorado Junior Classical League, National Latin Honors Society; can win scholarships and awards.  GREAT for college applications!

AP Latin (Advanced Placement Latin): (College-level course: Some textbooks need to be purchased.)  Read selections from Caesar and Vergil. Review of Latin vocabulary and grammar.  National Latin Exam – can win an award!  Can participate in Latin Club, Colorado Junior Classical League, National Latin Honors Society; can win scholarships and awards. GREAT for college applications!


About the Latin 100 Text:

Latin 100 and Latin 200 use the Orberg book Lingua Latina per se Illustrata. I dislike most textbooks, and did not use a textbook as our main source until I found this book. The Orberg book is EXCELLENT. Some strengths:

 > It is actually a novel written in Latin; it’s a fun, interesting story with characters the students either love or love to hate. 90% of students actually read ahead – sometimes far ahead – just to find out what happens next. The story then blends into actual Latin by classical authors.

 > The entire book is in Latin. No English anywhere. That’s right! No explanations or glossary. How does it work? It uses the natural (or immersion) method. Each word is understandable based on context and pictures; the stories were very carefully written to introduce just 1 or 2 new ideas/constructions at a time, so they slowly build from “Marcus is a boy” to authentic texts by Catullus, etc. Students read and hear each chapter multiple times to really absorb how the Latin feels – they get a great natural sense of “right” and “wrong,” as they have for English, e.g. “The dog food the eat” vs. “The dog eats the food.”  (Note:  We also provide full explanations of the grammar in a written Chapter Packet and an oral (mp3 recording) explanation of each chapter.  These files are found in the Dropbox folder that will be shared with you.)

 > It introduces three times as many words (vocabulary) as any standard textbook. This helps students avoid the annoying problem of having to read with a dictionary at their side when they reach the higher levels.

 > It has been used since the 1960’s with very many students, so it’s well-tested. The text has not changed in the recent past, and there are no plans to change it in the future. It’s the “cutting edge” for Latin instruction, but it’s also “tried and true.” People who do Orberg LOVE Orberg. He sent us some additional unpublished stories – ask to see them!

 > It’s completely opposite of the “grammar/translation” method by which I learned. There are not pages of meaningless charts to memorize. It really is “grammar without pain.” It’s FUN!

Click here to see more about the book (opens new window).

Last modified: Monday, 8 August 2016, 12:16 AM